Zika Virus Information

Zika virus is spread to people through mosquito bites. Prior to 2015, Zika virus outbreaks have occurred in areas of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. In May 2015, the first confirmed Zika virus infections were discovered in Brazil.  The Zika virus is transmitted through mosquito bites.  To prevent the Zika Virus, use insect repellents to prevent mosquito bites; this includes everyone (children, pregnant and nursing women). When weather permits, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.  Use air conditioning or window/door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.

No locally transmitted Zika cases have been reported in the continental United States, but cases have been reported in returning travelers, and it has recently been predicted that Zika will eventually enter the United States.

It is important to note, that for most people, the Zika virus is relatively mild and not fatal.  The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache. The incubation period (the time from exposure to symptoms) for Zika virus disease is not known, but is likely to be a few days to a week.

A correlation has identified potential birth defects to infants born to a mother with the Zika virus, specifically microcephaly (a small, underdeveloped brain) that leads to further complications.  In response, CDC has issued a travel alert (Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions) for people traveling to regions and certain countries where Zika virus transmission is ongoing. Pregnant women should strongly consider postponing travel to the tropical climates identified as those where the Zika virus is known to exist.
Though this has not become an issue for the Syracuse University community, we recommend if you have recently traveled abroad to one of the countries listed by the CDC and have any symptoms to follow up with a health professional or contact S.U. Health Services at (315) 443-9005.

Helpful Resources: 

Zika: The Basics of the Virus and How to Protect Against It

Zika Travel Information

Areas with Zika

A Guide to Affirmative Consent

When you’re looking for enthusiastic consent from your partner, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • A lack of a ‘no’ doesn’t mean ‘yes.’
  • ‘No’ is not a challenge to overcome. When unsure of your partner’s response, ask.
  • Resorting to manipulation, “wearing down” your partner, or waiting until he or she stops saying ‘no’ is not enthusiastic consent.
  • Never have sex with someone whose freedom of judgement is impaired. A drunk person who is unconscious cannot actually consent to sex. If your partner is too drunk to consent, back off.
  • No matter how long you’ve been together, show respect for your partner. If you want to and he or she doesn’t, back off.
  • Flirting, dancing, kissing, an invitation back to a bedroom…none of those equals consent to sex. If your partner says no to sex and you don’t stop, that’s rape.

To learn more about what Syracuse University is doing to inform incoming students about New York State’s “Enough is Enough” legislation, please visit the Office of Health Promotion’s website.

You can view further information about the Sexual and Relationship Violence Response process at the Counseling Center website

A Letter from Chief Bobby Maldonado

Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Dear Students, Parents, Faculty, and Staff:

Yesterday morning, the Department of Public Safety (DPS) distributed information about two off campus incidents involving two Syracuse University students. As Chief of DPS and as the father of two Syracuse University students, my number one priority is and always will be the safety and well-being of all members of the Syracuse University community.

One crime is one too many. We have taken a series of comprehensive actions, and implemented a number of new initiatives over the past few years, to do everything we possibly can to reduce crime in the off-campus neighborhoods that border the University. The DPS is working closely with the Syracuse Police Department (SPD) regarding these incidents and has immediately increased patrols of areas around campus.

I am reaching out to you today to share important safety information, as well as to answer some of your more frequently asked questions. Those questions include:

Q. There were recently Public Safety Notices about robbery incidents and sexual assault offenses – is there a problem with crime on campus?
A. Timely warnings regarding crime on and immediately adjacent to campus are required by a federal law called “the Clery Act.” It is our practice to also issue these notices when a student is the victim of a crime that could pose a continuing threat in the neighborhoods near campus. We do this not to alarm, but to alert the campus community to any potential ongoing neighborhood crime threats. An open line of communication is critical to crime prevention.

Q. What precautions are taken to protect the campus community, particularly students who live on or around campus?
A. In the past two years we have:
• Increased night time DPS patrol and investigations supervision.
• Increased our walking escort capability.
• Added a late night safety escort shuttle until 3:30am on Sunday through Wednesday nights; and created an overnight student safety shuttle service on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays until regular bus services start at 6:00 a.m.

Q. Are your offices equipped to handle these incidents?
A. • DPS officers are sworn, police academy-trained, armed, campus peace officers with full powers of arrest.
• Coverage often includes more than 20 DPS peace officers on duty during peak student activity nights and hours.
• Several area law enforcement agencies provide patrol coverage. In addition to DPS officers and Syracuse Police Department (SPD) Officers, there are also police officers from SUNY ESF, the VA Hospital and the SUNY Upstate Medical University patrolling the university hill area.
• Our officers also have completely interoperable two-way radios that connect them to officers from the SPD and other area law enforcement officers. We are always connected and communicating to provide a safe, comfortable, and welcoming environment.
• During the day, among patrol officers, patrol supervisors, detectives and personnel from other agencies, there are often more than 20 officers covering a two square mile area.

Q. What about security in the residence halls?
A. • Every residence hall has assigned residential security aides who monitor access at night with direct radio contact to the DPS Emergency Communications Center.
• The staff of Residence Life work to educate the students about how to be safe on campus and in their residence (see the list below).

Q. What about off-campus, are those areas secure?
A.
• In addition to our on-campus presence, the DPS Orange Watch unit has added 40 percent more patrols to the off-campus neighborhood areas on Sunday through Wednesday nights during the academic year and 60 percent more patrols on Thursdays through Saturday nights.
• This results in walking, bicycle, or vehicle patrols on virtually every student rental area street every few minutes, a practice that has contributed to immediate arrests in incidents over the past few years and a reduction of about 33 percent in serious incidents in the immediate off campus areas.
• DPS is also working closely with our colleagues at the SPD and have a number of joint SPD/DPS teams in Neighborhood Safety Patrols in immediate off-campus and fraternity/sorority neighborhoods on Friday and Saturday nights. These marked patrols focus on quality of life issues and student safety.

Q. What is the level of crime in the SU area?
A. • Over the past two years, there has been a downward trend in serious crime in the university neighborhood areas.
• We have several 24-hour on-campus mobile, bicycle and walking patrols in the neighborhoods, minimizing the likelihood of serious incidents.
• In the past year, we added four SPD officers and four DPS officers focusing on prevention of serious crime via a joint patrol called the University Area Crime-Control Team (U-ACT).

Q. Do you have any other security tools besides patrols?
A. • Within the last academic year the University completed a fifth phase of a multi-year camera system installation that now includes the placement of nearly 1000 cameras at the entrances and exits of all residence halls, at parking garages, at other strategic on-campus locations, throughout South Campus and in and around the Carrier Dome.
• Additional cameras are now being installed in several walkways and pathways on and near campus.
• We’ve enhanced Orange Alert, our campus crisis notification system, with the installation of outdoor sirens on both North and South campuses.
• We have over 145 Blue Light emergency call boxes around campus.
• All of these technologies are monitored in our new state-of-the-art Emergency Communications Center.
• The campus transportation system has been enhanced with additional routes to cover more off campus housing locations. We have shuttles that stop throughout campus through both Centro and Birnie Bus and they are the primary means of safe transportation in the area.
• DPS offers a supplement to these services when bus service stops at 3:00 a.m. through both walking and riding safety escorts available by calling 443-SAFE.
• We continually work to educate our students about safety (see the list below).

Q. What can the campus community do to help?
A. We are continually looking for ways to improve our services and increase our effectiveness. If you have any suggestions or ideas to build on our efforts, we would be happy to hear from you. Please be assured that we take the safety of the campus community as seriously as our own.

We advise that the campus community take the following precautions at all times:
• Take advantage of the CENTRO and Birnie Bus bus services. Plan commutes to and from campus around the bus schedules when possible. Taxi services are also available.
• After dark, take advantage of the free safety escort services available through the Department of Public Safety. Both walking and shuttle services are available to students, staff, and faculty. Call 443-SAFE (7233) for more information about these services.
• Walk, bike or jog in groups of three or more, away from bushes, cars, and other objects a suspect could hide behind.
• Be aware of your surroundings: look and listen. Headphones and cell phones can create tunnel vision and block out surrounding sound. Be alert at all times.
• Travel in well-lit and populated areas.
• Keep porch lights on at night.
• Don’t approach strangers or let them get close to you.
• If you think someone is following you, switch directions or cross the street. Go toward an open business or lighted house.
• Have your house or car keys in hand before you reach your door. It is a good practice to carry your keys in your hand while traveling to your residence.
• Know where campus blue light alarms are and how to use them.
• If someone tries to rob you, don’t resist. Give up your property, not your life.
• If you are in a safe place to do so, attempt to get a description of the suspect(s) and any associated vehicles or license plate numbers.
• Be vigilant and report suspicious activity.

Also, please let me take this opportunity to encourage you to program the DPS phone number into your cell phone contacts (315.443.2224) and to download the LiveSafe App for Syracuse University. Information on how to download and sign up.

I am happy to talk with you, and encourage you to submit any feedback or questions you have to DPS directly using the Department’s Feedback Form.

Parents Office Interim Director Missy Mathis-Hanlon is also ready and available to assist parents of students in any way. Missy can be reached at 315.443.1200.

Again, your safety is my number one priority.

Chief Bobby Maldonado
Syracuse University
Department of Public Safety

Traveling for Spring Break

Before you leave:

  • Check the Department of State’s travel advisories and warnings before you choose your destination.
  • Research and know the local laws.
  • Pack your health insurance card!
  • Plan to travel with friends. It’s best to travel in groups of three or more.
  • Discuss your plans and itenerary with your roommates and your family.
  • Discuss plans, itineraries and activities with your travel mates.
  • Look into the services provided by International SOS
  • Make sure you have sufficient lighting around all of your doors, especially those not visible from the street. Buy a motion-sensitive light or a timer that automatically turns on exterior lights at a predetermined time.

Tips for International Travel:

  • Keep the number for SU Public Safety 24/7 Assistance: (011-1-)315-443-2224
  • Learn the local area’s emergency response call number (e.g. 911 in the US)
  • Check your destination’s U.S. Embassy Web site for posted warnings and research your destination
  • Sign your passport and complete the emergency information page
  • Copy your passport twice using a copy machine. Stash one copy in your suitcase, and leave the other with your roommates or your family at home.
  • Research and know local laws
  • Know the general perceptions of Americans in the area
  • Research and know legitimate local transportation procedures
  • Copy traveler’s checks or pre-loaded VISA/AMX gift type cards. Avoid using ATMs.
  • Consider renting an international cellular phone instead of using your own phone. US-based “smart phones” are often hacked for bank and other personal information if lost abroad.
  • Other international travel safety contact numbers:
    • National Crime Victim Center: (011-1-) 800-FYI-CALL
    • Overseas U.S. Citizen Services: (011-1-) 888-407-4747
    • Sexual Assault Hotline: (011-1-) 800-656-HOPE
    • U.S. Victim Assistance: (011-1-) 800-TRY-NOVA
    • Victim Assistance online: www.vaonline.org

When you leave for breaks:

  • Always, always, ALWAYS lock your door. Before leaving for break, double- and triple-check your doors and windows. Place a wooden or metal bar in the track of sliding doors.
  • Don’t hide spare keys outside.
  • Keep your valuables out of sight. Don’t leave a game console or laptop lying around in full view of the windows or doors.
  • Make sure all of your windows are secure and have curtains on them.
  • If your neighbor is staying in the area while you’re away, arrange to have them watch over the house from time to time.

When you’re on vacation:

  • Never leave a friend with a stranger or group of people you don’t know.
  • Follow the local laws you brushed up on before leaving home.
  • Carry your health insurance card with you.
  • Avoid using ATM’s whenever possible
  • Do not carry large amounts of cash with you.
  • NEVER leave your valuables unattended, even at the beach. Use lockers if available!
  • Always travel in groups of three or more, and don’t let members of your group go off alone.

Attend Take Back the Night (#TBTN) 2016

Rally. March. Speak-Out.

Take Back the Night (TBTN) is an event where women, men and trans* individuals join together to speak out against sexual and domestic violence.  Join us on:

Monday March 30, 2016 @ 7:00 pm

History of Take Back the Night

Take Back the Night is an annual event, observed throughout the United States as well as internationally, that brings community members together to speak out about sexual violence, relationship violence, and other forms of interpersonal violence. Take Back the Night provides an opportunity for community members to proclaim that each individual has the right to live free from violence and for the voices of those who have been affected by violence to be heard.

The origins of Take Back the Night are uncertain. Take Back the Night may have started in London, England in 1877, when women protested the fear and violence they experienced in streets at night. Others believe that the first rally occurred in 1976 in Belgium when women attending the International Tribunal on Crimes Against Women lit candles and took to the streets to denounce the continuation of violence against women. Regardless of the origin of Take Back the Night, what is clear is the importance of these events. Thousands of Take Back the Night marches and rallies have taken place worldwide, including on college campuses, and this tradition continues.

Traditionally held in April each year, Take Back the Night is a collaboration of campus and community members, coming together to take a stand against all violence, to raise awareness about attitudes that perpetuate violence, and to discuss ways we can work together to make the night safe for all members of the community. Take Back the Night at Syracuse University is a series of events designed to bring all members of our community together to encourage dialogue about sexual, relationship and other forms of interpersonal violence. The events culminate in a rally, march and speak-out at Hendricks Chapel. The rally and march provide a forum for members of our community to come together to take a stand publicly and proclaim that the violence must end. The speak-out that follows is a smaller, private gathering where individuals have the opportunity to talk in a safe space about how violence has impacted their lives and to talk with one another about what each of us can do to work to end the violence.


 

Take Back the Night Proclamation

The following is the Take Back the Night invitation to support a community committed to ending sexual and relationship violence.

“As members of the Syracuse University and SUNY ESF community, the faculty and staff of our department/office will not tolerate any form of sexual or relationship violence on this campus. Every member of our community is entitled to live and work in a respectful, safe environment, and we are committed to work toward creating such an environment. It is on all of us to support those impacted by sexual and relationship violence and demonstrate our commitment to speaking up and stepping in.”

Supporters of this commitment will be recognized in posters and a Daily Orange ad the week of Take Back the Night.

For more information, visit the Office of Health Promotion’s webpage.

Public Safety Notice: Robbery, 12/15/2012

For the protection and safety of SU students, faculty, staff and neighbors, the Department of Public Safety releases the following alert:

Robbery

Sunday, December 15, 2012 at or about 2:00 am

SPD Case # 12-548465

401 Van Buren Street, near the patio area

On Saturday, December 15, 2012 at or about 2:00 am, three students reported that they were approached by an unknown man while they were outside of a residence hall patio area located at 401 Van Buren Street, Brewster/Boland/Brockway Halls. The students state that the suspect displayed a knife and demanded their property, which consisted of money, a debit card, SUID, and cell phone. The students did not sustain any injuries. The suspect then fled on foot in a southwest direction away from campus.

DPS asks for your help in identifying a suspect if you were in the vicinity at the time of the incident. For this purpose, the following is the description of the suspect:

The suspect is described as male, black, 5’ 6”, medium build, 18-22 years of age last seen wearing dark clothing, a dark hooded sweatshirt with writing on the back and the left front of the hooded sweatshirt.

For an interactive map of the incident location, refer to the Google Map.

If anyone has any information regarding this incident or others, please contact the Syracuse Police Department at (315) 442-5222 or the Syracuse University Department of Public Safety at (315) 443-2224.

If you would like to anonymously report NON-EMERGENCY information to DPS, you can use the Silent Witness tool.


For your safety, please remember:

  • Take advantage of the CENTRO and Birnie Bus services. Taxi services are also available.
  • After dark, take advantage of the free safety escort services available through the Department of Public Safety. Both walking
    and shuttle services are available to students, staff, and faculty at SU or SUNY-ESF. Call 443-SAFE (7233) for more
    information about these services.Walk, bike or jog in groups of three or more, away from bushes, cars, and other objects a suspect could hide behind.
  • Plan your walking travel times by avoiding late to early morning hours.
  • Be aware of your surroundings: look and listen. Headphones and cell phones can create tunnel vision.
  • Travel in well-lit and populated areas. Keep porch lights on at night.
  • Download the LiveSafe app on your Android or iOS smart phone. The app provides a virtual escort feature you can use with friends and quick links to important public safety information. Set the app to Syracuse University and sign up with your syr.edu email address!
  • Don’t approach strangers or let them get close to you. If you think someone is following you, switch directions or cross the street. Go toward an open business or lighted house.
  • Have your house or car keys in hand before you reach your door.
  • Know where campus blue light alarms are and how to use them.
  • If someone tries to rob you, don’t resist. Give up your property, not your life. If you are in a safe place to do so, attempt to get a description of the suspect(s) and any associated vehicles or license plate numbers.
  • IMMEDIATELY report emergencies or suspicious activities, persons and vehicles.

For Public Safety dial 315-443-2224 or #78 (from a cell phone); if you are in a situation where you cannot safely make a phone call, send a text message to 711@syr.edu; for Syracuse Police, dial 911. Your quick reporting may help prevent others from becoming victims.

This public safety information is issued for your safety in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act.

Public Safety Notice: Off-Campus Strong Arm Robberies and Arrests, 10/27/2012

For the protection and safety of SU students, faculty, staff and neighbors, the Department of Public Safety releases the following alert:

Off-Campus Strong Arm Robberies and Arrests

Sunday, October 28, 2012

SPD Case Numbers 12-491344, 12-491389, and 12-491535

On Saturday, October 27, 2012, at approximately 10:21 p.m., a student reported being robbed by two males at 560 Clarendon Ave. The student reports he was walking west on Clarendon Ave when he encountered two men walking towards him. As the men approached the student, he was surrounded on both sides and one of the suspects hit him in his mouth. He was knocked to the ground and kicked in his head and ribs. The student stated one of the suspects reached into his pocket and took cash. The suspects left traveling west on Clarendon Ave towards Ostrom Ave. This case is still under investigation – nobody has been charged at this time. DPS asks for your help in identifying the suspects if you were in the vicinity at the time of the incident. For this purpose, the following is the description of the suspect:

Suspect # 1: male, black, 5’10”, about 20 years of age wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt.

Suspect # 2: male, black, 5’10”, about 20 years of age wearing a red/maroon hooded sweatshirt.

The Syracuse Police Department with the assistance of the Department of Public Safety has announced several arrests in connection with the below listed robberies that occurred in the East Neighborhood area Saturday night/Sunday morning. The investigation into all these robberies is active and on-going. All three suspects are being held in the Onondaga County Justice Center in downtown Syracuse.

Incident #1/Arrests Made: On Saturday, October 27, 2012, at approximately 10:45 p.m., two graduate students reported being assaulted and robbed by three males at Fellows Ave. and Euclid Ave.

Incident #2/Arrests Made: On Saturday, October 27, 2012, at approximately 10:50 p.m., a student reported being assaulted and robbed by three males in the 400 block of Stratford Ave.

For an interactive map of the incident location, refer to the Google Map.

If anyone has any information regarding this incident or others, please contact the Syracuse Police Department at (315) 442-5222 or the Syracuse University Department of Public Safety at (315) 443-2224.

If you would like to anonymously report NON-EMERGENCY information to DPS, you can use the Silent Witness tool.


For your safety, please remember:

  • Take advantage of the CENTRO and Birnie Bus services. Taxi services are also available.
  • After dark, take advantage of the free safety escort services available through the Department of Public Safety. Both walking
    and shuttle services are available to students, staff, and faculty at SU or SUNY-ESF. Call 443-SAFE (7233) for more
    information about these services.Walk, bike or jog in groups of three or more, away from bushes, cars, and other objects a suspect could hide behind.
  • Plan your walking travel times by avoiding late to early morning hours.
  • Be aware of your surroundings: look and listen. Headphones and cell phones can create tunnel vision.
  • Travel in well-lit and populated areas. Keep porch lights on at night.
  • Download the LiveSafe app on your Android or iOS smart phone. The app provides a virtual escort feature you can use with friends and quick links to important public safety information. Set the app to Syracuse University and sign up with your syr.edu email address!
  • Don’t approach strangers or let them get close to you. If you think someone is following you, switch directions or cross the street. Go toward an open business or lighted house.
  • Have your house or car keys in hand before you reach your door.
  • Know where campus blue light alarms are and how to use them.
  • If someone tries to rob you, don’t resist. Give up your property, not your life. If you are in a safe place to do so, attempt to get a description of the suspect(s) and any associated vehicles or license plate numbers.
  • IMMEDIATELY report emergencies or suspicious activities, persons and vehicles.

For Public Safety dial 315-443-2224 or #78 (from a cell phone); if you are in a situation where you cannot safely make a phone call, send a text message to 711@syr.edu; for Syracuse Police, dial 911. Your quick reporting may help prevent others from becoming victims.

This public safety information is issued for your safety in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act

Public Safety Notice: Harassment, 10/25/2012

For the protection and safety of SU students, faculty, staff and neighbors, the Department of Public Safety releases the following alert:

Harassment

Date Issued: October 25, 2012

SPD Case # 12-488084)

Intersection of Marshall Street and Comstock Avenue

On Thursday, October 25, 2012, at approximately 4:30 p.m., the Department of Public Safety was made aware of a harassment incident involving a student that had just occurred in front of Haven Dining Hall near the intersection of Marshall St. and Comstock Ave. The student reported that he was physically attacked as he attempted to walk past two males. The student was sprayed with pepper spray, struck in the chest and wrestled to the ground. The student received minor injuries.

DPS asks for your help in identifying the suspects if you were in the vicinity at the time of the incident. For this purpose, the following is the description of the suspects:

Suspect # 1: male, black, 5’ 10”, medium build, early 20’s, wearing a black hoodie and baggy jeans, Suspect # 2: male, black, 5’ 10”, stocky build, early 20’s, wearing a black hoodie and baggy jeans. The suspects were last seen heading north on Walnut. Ave.

Public Safety Notice: Off-Campus Attempted Robbery, 10/25/2012

For the protection and safety of SU students, faculty, staff and neighbors, the Department of Public Safety releases the following alert:

Off-Campus Attempted Robbery

Notice Issued October 26, 2012

Case # 12- 488540

900 block of Lancaster Avenue

On Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 10:40 p.m., a student reported to DPS that when he was walking in the 900 block of Lancaster Ave, between Stratford St. and Kensington Rd. he was approached by two males, one of whom asked to use his cellphone. The student told the man he couldn’t use his cellphone. One of the men then pressed something against his back, walked him up a driveway in between two houses, and demanded his cellphone and headphones. After the student gave the suspects his cellphone and headphones, he observed that one of the men held a black handgun. As the student began to walk away, the suspects gave the student his personal property back. The suspects then ran north on Lancaster Ave.

DPS asks for your help in identifying the suspects if you were in the vicinity at the time of the incident. For this purpose, the following is the description of the suspects:

Suspect # 1: male, black, 5’ 7”, 20-22 years of age, thick build, wearing a charcoal grey sweatshirt and blue jeans; Suspect # 2: male, black, 5’ 9”, 20-22 years of age, slim build, wearing a blue hoodie and darker blue jeans.

Public Safety Notice: Orange Madness, 10/13/2012

For the protection and safety of Syracuse University students, faculty, staff and neighbors, SU’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) releases the following message:

We are writing to inform the SU campus community of an incident that took place Friday night at the Orange Madness event in the Carrier Dome. Orange Madness is the annual celebration event for the men’s and women’s basketball teams as the upcoming seasons approach.

Toward the end of the event, at approximately 9:30 p.m., during a fight on the Dome concourse, a non-SU affiliated person was stabbed in the upper shoulder area by an unknown assailant, also believed to be a non-SU affiliated individual. The suspect fled the scene and there is no specific suspect information at this time. The event was subsequently ended and patrons left the Dome without further incident.

The University takes this incident very seriously. It is important to note that Orange Madness is a unique event at the Dome, as it is free to the public via general-admission entry, unlike most other ticketed events there. The University has already begun to carefully review the ticketing, seating and overall plan for future Orange Madness events. Syracuse Police, SU Department of Public Safety, and Carrier Dome security staff work in partnership to ensure the safety and security of all patrons, and the Dome has a more than 30-year track record of hosting events in a safe and secure manner.

The Syracuse City Police are actively investigating this incident and if you have any information about it, please call 315-442-5222.

Sincerely,

Chief Anthony Callisto, Director of Public Safety

Peter Sala, Senior Associate Athletics Director for Facility Operations & Carrier Dome Managing Director